Posted in About the Book

Behind the Scenes: Character Development: The Underdeveloped

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I’m doing a 4-month blog series on character development. I want this series to be both for the writer and the reader. I hope to fellowship with other authors and pass along some tips while also entertaining the readers by showing you a side of your favorite characters that you’ve never seen before.
If you’re finding this series for the first time, you’ve entered in on the 2nd post. I’ll post the next installment on the first Monday of May. Here’s a link to last month’s post if you missed it.

I’m a learn as you go sort of gal. When I started writing, I hadn’t planned on it. Meaning, I didn’t attend college with the thought of writing fiction. In fact, I hadn’t even picked up my first book on writing until I had written my first novel. So there were several things that I learned later in my journey that might have made things easier to have known up front. Character development is one of those things.

If you read last month’s post you would have read a list of easy to work with characters. I truly had a writer’s dream cast in my first novel and didn’t even know it! With characters ready and willing to spill their guts and allow me into the dark corners of their minds, it’s little wonder that I was confused when I came across a character that wouldn’t speak to me. After working with Claire, Frank, Olen, and Ralph in Where Can I Flee, I wasn’t prepared for the withdrawn Sally Chandler in In the Shadow of Thy Wings. So why wouldn’t this sweet gal talk to me?

So why wouldn’t this sweet gal talk to me?

I sought the advice of a dear friend of mine, Dana Kamstra. Dana, along with being my writing buddy, is a gold mine for writing advice. She approaches writing the way any serious student should: she studies it. So she’s my go-to gal when I need a new technique. She helped me to understand that an underdeveloped character won’t speak. She also passed on one of her favorite (and now one of my favorite) writing books, Plot versus Character by Jeff Gerke.

Plot vs Character helped me to understand which questions to ask and how to layer the many details of any character together until you have someone that looks and feels real. One of the focal points is understanding the character’s Briggs Personality. And this is where the fun begins… 🙂

For those that have never heard of Briggs, let me explain. He basically narrowed down 16 foundational personality types. By answering a series of questions, they’ll determine your personality type. If you’ve never done this for yourself, try it out! It’s fun and enlightening. Take the test for free here.

And then enjoy my favorite site for gathering extensive information about the personality types.

As an author, this is now one of my first stops to character development. Once I have a personality type determined, I’m able to see how this person may react to different situations and it helps me understand them.

Now for some fun, let’s talk personality types. I had taken the test and learned that I am ISFP – The Artist
Once I began exploring the personality type, I found that it made a lot of sense. Suddenly I understood why I found beauty in random objects like a plate of food. Other oddities suddenly made sense, like how I can’t stand to be locked into a schedule. I like the freedom to decide what I want to do and when I want to do it. I seriously have never been able to resist rebelling against my own schedules. Lol
I hate conflict but am a great listener and peacemaker. I pick up on the feelings of other people and am a good judge of character. A perfectionist and fiercely loyal.
It’s been helpful to me as I dug deeper into my personality type and began to understand the whys behind the things that I never noticed about myself before. I stopped trying to schedule myself and embraced my fly-by-the-seat-of-my-pants mentality.

How about your favorite characters from the Ancient Words Series
Claire Harper: ESFP The Performer
Claire is at home being the center of attention. She’s fun-loving and chatty.
Frank Harper: INFJ The Protector
Frank tends to stick to things until they’re finished. He’s sensitive and quietly forceful.
Eddie Chandler: ESTP A Doer
Eddie is spontaneous and compulsive. He’s a man of action and not words.
George Chandler: ISFJ The Nurturer
George is very responsible with a deep desire to serve others. He’s gifted at observing other people.
Sally Chandler: ISFP The Artist
Sally is very quiet and kind. She’s sensitive to the feelings of others and she HATES conflict.
Ralph Williams: ENTJ The Executive
Ralph is a take-charge kind of person. He’s a natural leader and a long term planner.

Now it’s your turn! What is your personality type and how does it fit?

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5 thoughts on “Behind the Scenes: Character Development: The Underdeveloped

    1. How fun!! What are a couple points that sounded like you and a couple that didn’t?
      One of mine that cracks me up every time is where they say that people of my personality type typically don’t like to be in charge. FALSE! Lol I don’t mind it one bit. I can be quite comfortable being in charge, actually. 😉

      Like

  1. ISFJ – The Nurterer
    Live in a world that is routine and kind. Strong sense of responsibility and duty.
    Doesn’t like to explore new ways of doing things. (That is me!)
    Learn best by doing rather than reading. (Yes!)
    They have a strong ability to keep things running smoothly (I just figured I didn’t like a lot of drama and emotions!)
    Is not likely to express their feelings but are well aware of others people’s feelings (True and very interesting!)
    Best Job: Social work or Non-Profit (Good thing I work for a church!)
    My favorite: They make extremely good interior decorators (Nope! Don’t have a clue on how to decorate!)

    Liked by 1 person

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