Posted in History

Civil War Letters: The Power of a Praying Parent

2013_05252013spring0048Here’s one of my favorites that I came across early in my research. This one is bound to warm the heart of the parent:
One soldier was given an extra $10 in pay by accident. He writes of the incident:
“I confess that when bringing it to the tent I intended to keep it, and send it home. But God has preserved me from this great sin… The parting prayer of my mother was that I might not prove a coward or become a drunkard. But she never dreamed that her son could become a thief… Therefore, Mr. Satan, catch me asleep again if you can; you have got not only me to fight, but a good mother at home.”

“Train up a child in the way he should go, and when he is old he will not depart from it.”
*Click on the “Civil War Letters” tag on the right to read more real letters.
** The picture of the Bible is a Bible that was recovered from the Stones River Battlefield in Murfreesboro, Tennessee where it now sits on display.
2013_05252013spring0164-1 Announcement!! I will be starting a new blog series and giveaway next Monday! The series is titled, “Experiencing History: Reliving the End of the Civil War, Moment by Moment.” The title is a mouth full, but it will be a load of fun. Lol The series and giveaway will run for 10 consecutive days. I will share details in real time from various events from 150 years ago. We’ll start days before Lee surrenders to Grant and continue through the assassination of Lincoln. While in Virginia for the reenactment, I will be shopping for the giveaway. I plan to give away a souvenir from the 150th Anniversary of Lee’s surrender. Expect more detail in Monday’s post! Hope to see you then!
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2 thoughts on “Civil War Letters: The Power of a Praying Parent

    1. You know, that’s the only down fall to reading random letters is not knowing what happened next.
      😉 If you like wonderfully honest letters, I have a great one for you. It cracks me up. I’ll have to make a point to share that one sooner rather than later.

      Like

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